Actions

History of legal and political thought: the concept of empire from its origins to the present day

From Baripedia

History of legal and political thought: the concept of empire from its origins to the present day
Description de cette image, également commentée ci-après

Famous representation of the different schools of Antiquity: in the centre, we recognise Plato pointing to the sky (an allusion to his theory of Ideas) and Aristotle pointing to the earth (an allusion to his concern to anchor knowledge in the examination of empirical facts). Detail of a fresco by Raphael (c. 1511).

Professeur(s) Alexis Keller[1][2][3]
Cours History of legal and political thought: the concept of empire from its origins to the present day

Lectures


This course is intended for students in law, international relations and political science. Starting from the Roman case, it presents the different visions of empire that confronted each other in Europe from the end of the 10th century onwards. Particular attention is paid to the legal and political problems raised by the discovery of the New World (1492) and by the birth of the great European empires resulting from the conquest. The main currents of classical international law are addressed, drawing on authors such as Vitoria, Grotius and Vattel.[4]

Cours[edit | edit source]

The history of the concept of empire

The foundations of the Roman model

Rome's Western heritage: the Holy Roman Empire

The papal conception of the empire and the emperor as dominus mundi

The legal and political problems of the conquest I

The legal-political problems of the conquest II

From empire to federation: the American case

Can a democracy be an empire?

Annexes[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]